Living The Good Life: Religion, Human Flourishing, and The Common Good.

Mar 30, 2016 | Salons

This is a guest post by Stephen Setzer– an Associate Rector at Christ Church Christiana Hundred

For centuries religious institutions have been harbours of thought and ideas about the divine, the world, and culture. Of course, in the case of the Christian Church, we’ve not always been welcoming places for science, but in recent decades we’ve done much better (consider the work of the Catholic Church in accepting the developments of evolutionary science and Pope Francis’ embrace of environmental justice).

Despite this obtuse overlooking of science, the church did nurture some of greatest medieval minds in Western culture. Consider Augustine of Hippo or Thomas Aquinas. And it was the church, in Western culture, that promoted the flourishing of art and music as much as any other institution. Consider the mass settings of Bach, Haydn, or Palestrina; the paintings and sculptures of Michelangelo or Raphael. And even in my speaking of this, I’m aware that I’ve left out all influence of the Eastern Orthodox in Turkey and Greece and Russia; I’ve left out the influence of Islam in Cordoba and North Africa and Mecca. Religious institutions across the globe for centuries have been the epicenter for the life of the mind and the life of the spirit.

It seems very fitting, then, that one of the most prominent thinking institutions in contemporary culture, TED and TEDx, will be featured at a church this April through a TEDxWilmingtonSalon.

Christ Church Christiana Hundred is thrilled to be hosting TEDx Wilmington for a TEDxSalon on April 30 at 10:00am. And the topic couldn’t be more germane to my brief exposition above. As I said, for centuries religious institutions have been harbours of thought and ideas, the epicentre for the life of the mind and the life of the spirit, thus the title for this TEDxSalon is “Living The Good Life: Religion, Human Flourishing, and The Common Good.”

I know that this is going to be an event worth attending, full of “ideas worth spreading.”